pedi wedding| south african wedding blog

Zulu And Pedi Wedding

posted in: Home, Traditional Weddings | 12

Shuuuu!!! I feel like I can finally breathe now. The stress of moving the blog from one address to another is finally over. So I can go back to doing what I do best; sharing and lusting after weddings. This Zulu/Pedi wedding is the first post at the new address. Therefore I thought I’d hit you with a gorgeous colourful traditional wedding to beat the Monday blues.

I love cultural weddings (I also adore white weddings, in fact, all weddings). They’re so rich in culture, it’s amazing. Especially when you have two cultures merge like this Zulu/Pedi wedding.

From tailor-made traditional wear to singing and dancing, this Zulu/Pedi wedding does not disappoint. I can only image how eclectic the atmosphere must have been. ENJOY!PEDI WEDDINGsepedi wedding9The Proposal Story
We went out for dinner, upon arriving at home he proposed, which was perfect for me because I had once mentioned that I would love him to do it in private. A week later we had our lobola negotiations. My ring is exactly what I wanted.PEDI WEDDING | South africa wedding blogpedi wedding

The Planning Process
I enjoyed planning our traditional wedding/umembeso, because I had the help of my fiancé, mom and 2 sisters. We started planning immediately after the lobola negotiations as we had 6 months to plan. The last few months leading to our pedi wedding, we involved our extended family, who were helpful.pedi wedding

The Creative’/Suppliers
I found my suppliers through family, friends and from the internet.

One Thing I’d Change
Researching more on particular suppliers and probably requesting a mock up as some did not deliver what they promised.pedi wedding| south african wedding blog

pedi wedding| south african wedding blogpedi wedding| south african wedding blogCulture
Our traditional wedding was an infusion of Pedi and Zulu cultures uniting. We had 3 parts to our traditional wedding. The first part called umembeso, were my in-loves presented gifts to my parents and family in the form of blankets, doeks and pots.

The second part was the reception, where we had speeches and lunch was served. The food was traditional to accommodate both cultures.

The third part was an imperative ritual in my culture Sepedi. Where I was accompanied by married women outside my home, carrying gifts, food, alcohol, reed mats and mohlobolo (a certain cut from a cow) that was presented at the gate by my aunt to my in-loves.
The women had to cover up, by wearing headgear and a shawl as a sign of respect, myself included. At the gate a female representative from my in-loves accepted mohlobolo by placing it on her head, indicating that they are receiving the new member (makoti) into their family.

The food and drinks were taken back home to my in-loves, to show those that were left behind or could not make it, that all went well and to share the meat and alcohol with them.pedi wedding| south african wedding blogpedi wedding| south african wedding blogpedi wedding| south african wedding blogpedi wedding| south african wedding blog

Our Wedding in 7 Words
Love, Regal, Cultural, Colourful, Happiness, Laughter & Beautiful

Favourite Part Of The Day
The first session, where my family was presented with gifts, especially my mother and father. To me, this along with lobola is the highest form of honouring my parents culturally.

The Wedding Style
I had my dress tailor made. I wanted to wear the original Pedi attire. The top I wore is called Mothuhlwane worn by married women. I wore a maroon velvet doek with pins and had a leopard print scarf on my left arm/shoulder originally worn by people of royalty. I wore ditlhwatlhwadi around my ankles and to complete the look I got pink shoelaces for my white tommy takkies.PEDI WEDDING

Advice for Future Brides Ana Grooms
Save up and try stick to your budget, include your relatives in the planning and delegate tasks. But most importantly enjoy the process. I am so honoured to have gone through this right of passage.

Photographer: Madoda Mahlangu: 0733595084
[email protected]

Make-Up: Thokozile Jiyane
Flowers: Duncan florist Groblersdal

If you’ve loved this Zulu and Pedi wedding, you’ll adore this one

12 Responses

  1. Avatar
    Alex

    Hi, what’s the legal procedure for Pedi lobola? Is there a legal contract? Please reply with more information regarding damages and lobola for Pedi culture. I have tried to search but no luck.

    • Ika
      Ika

      Hi Alex
      As far as I know(and I stand to be corrected), there isn’t a legal bidding contract when lobala is paid. Lobola is a tradition celebration between a couple and their families and in some culture it is seen as marriage. With regards to damages, normally the family of the girl will send the letter to the family of the man who impregnated her and explain that they’ll come to have a chat(go bega molato). After that they’ll explain their demands and what they expect in compensation. That is all the info I can give you.

  2. Avatar
    Mxolisi

    Mmm I like l like am Zulu guy deeply in love with a Pedi woman.Am planning to pay lobola for her in December. I dnt know if u can help by sharing any cultural differences and similarities from both cultures.

    Thank you

  3. Avatar
  4. Avatar
  5. Avatar
    • Ika
      Ika

      Thank you so much for sending your wedding Mokgadi. Highly Appreciated!

  6. Avatar
    lungi

    This was a beautiful wedding, I love how they incorporated both cultures.
    Congrats on changing over your blog, it looks great, I love the new name

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